Come HOME to Refugee Week Scotland: 2009 programme launched

MEDIA RELEASE

Jun 4, 2009

 

Come HOME to Refugee Week Scotland

June 15-21, 2009: Programme Launched

 

The full programme for Refugee Week Scotland 2009 launches today with its biggest ever national line-up of events. Over 100 diverse arts, cultural and sporting events will take place across Scotland to mark this year’s Refugee Week, taking place from June 15-21. Download it here: www.scottishrefugeecouncil.org.uk/Programme_of_events

 

Among the highlights are the first-ever Refugee Week Film Festival, with screenings taking place in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee and Dumfries and the exclusive UK premiere of moving documentary, Kurdi. Made by Scottish film production company Autonomi, it tells the story of one man’s search for himself and his people in the aftermath of Saddam Hussein’s chemical gas attack on the Kurdish people.

 

Also scheduled is a full programme of comedy, dance and drama at Glasgow’s Tron Theatre including Second Home Comes First, a celebratory fusion of dance, music and poetry by the Maryhill Integration Network and Who Are You?, an exhilarating new theatre piece by the multi-award winning Knightswood Youth Theatre. Expect big names, and even bigger laughs, at the Red Cross Refugee Week Comedy Night hosted by Susan Calman.

 

Carrying on this year’s Refugee Week Scotland theme of ‘HOME’ which ties in with Scotland’s Year of Homecoming, Paragon Kaleidophone Ensemble and Pan African Arts Scotland Akaya present Home from Home, a performance of words, images and music telling the stories of people’s homes across the world.

 

A rich exhibition strand includes Peacemakers of Israel and Palestine by award winning photojournalist team Angela Catlin and Billy Briggs, who visited Israel and the West Bank to document the work of some remarkable peace initiatives.

 

Literature is also in abundance with Poetry in St Andrew Square Garden and a special event with author Cathy MacPhail, who shot to success with her first novel Run, Zan, Run, which won the Kathleen Fidler Award for new Scottish fiction.

 

There is also plenty of food for thought in the form of research and discussion events including Fugee in Context, an event based around the play by Abi Morgan about unaccompanied minors. Excerpts from the show will be given new meaning at the Scottish Parliament through feedback from the play’s young cast and input from young people seeking asylum in Scotland.  

 

A range of community celebrations will be held throughout the week by groups from across the globe - from Sudan to Cameroon – who have settled in Scotland.

 

And that’s just for starters – from multicultural football tournaments to film screenings and comedy to street carnivals, Refugee Week Scotland is an opportunity for all of us – no matter what our backgrounds – to embrace both the things we have in common, and those that set us apart.

 

For full programme and more information go to www.refugeeweek.org.uk/scotland

Check out and pass on our HOME video at

www.youtube.com/RefugeeWeekScotland

 

Or contact Clare Harris/ Karin Goodwin, Media and Communications Officers

0141 223 7927

07734 030 763

media@scottishrefugeecouncil.org.uk

 

//ends

 

Notes to Editors

 

  1. Refugee Week Scotland is coordinated by Scottish Refugee Council, www.scottishrefugeecouncil.org.uk and is a partner event with Homecoming Scotland.

 

  1. Refugee Week is a UK-wide programme of arts, cultural and educational events that celebrate the contribution of refugees to the UK, and encourages a better understanding between communities. Refugee Week 2009 will take place from 15th to 21st June.

 

  1. The purpose of Refugee Week is to deliver positive educational messages that counter fear, ignorance and negative stereotypes of refugees, through arts, cultural and educational events that celebrate the contribution of refugees to the UK, and promote understanding about the reasons why people seek sanctuary.

 

Refugee Week was first held in 1998, and was created in response to the increasingly negative perceptions of refugees and asylum seekers held by the general public in Britain. It remains the only UK-wide event that promotes the importance of sanctuary and the benefits it can bring to both refugees and host communities.